Nov 052016
 

Target Marketing is the concept of identifying interested and relevant prospects and introducing one’s goods and services to them through appropriate channels.

The key concept here is the adjective ‘relevant.’ However, wherever you look and whichever metric you measure it by this concept is a bust for the advertiser and the professional marketer. The failure of the concept, however, is even more dramatic when one contrasts it with the riches earned by the media and the channels involved.

Here are a couple of examples of the failure of the concept, which are directly related to the dearth of success in personalization as a key component of relevance:

The traditionally obvious example is your TV or radio set. They propagate advertising messages that are irrelevant or undesirable to the vast majority of their viewers. Here is the analogy: imagine if you had a $100 grocery budget every week and managed to waste $80 of it. In other words 80% of the budget is spent on items that end up down the proverbial drain or into trash. That clearly would be unacceptable, yet that is what is happening week in and week out (in TV and radio advertising, hopefully not your grocery budget). The 20% effectiveness rate may of course be quite exaggerated.

irrelevant

Enter the baron of personalization and relevance: the Internet. The web is the forum that leverages the magic of technology to render old media, well, old, and cure what ails marketing. A myriad of technologies have popped up to track the audience online and ensure relevance and effectiveness. Except let us actually examine the evidence. Here are two examples to which conceptually many could relate:

  • You are fifteen-years old and go on the Internet to watch a video of your favourite Montreal, Canada-based death metal band on YouTube. First, however, you have to watch a thirty-second video of an application called Grammarly, which is a grammatically inaccurate name for a company and namesake product that improves one’s grammar when applying for jobs, writing to a love interest or asking for a raise and other reasons.
  • You are a dutiful daughter who lives in an apartment and on a Saturday morning decide to order your retired mother a book on gardening from Amazon. The mother, you see, maintains a small garden behind her house as a hobby and a passion. Thereafter and forevermore – or at least until the daughter dumps the cookies and PIEs – she will see a selection of gardening books, tools and paraphernalia every time she visits Amazon (from the comfort of her twelfth floor pad).

The missed opportunity is not just in millions of wasted advertising dollars. It is also in the realization that there is an opportunity cost in not delivering relevant content to where it belongs and the potential for ill will. Does anyone not believe that annoying customers with impertinent advertising content is a wasteful marketing sin? Moreover, annoying potential customers can have a lingering adverse effect. Thousands of viewers were annoyed by Burger King years ago when the fast food chain’s commercials overlaid the live game during the world cup of football.

So, what needs to happen on the Internet and the coming universe of IOT? There is the promise of cognitive analytics to give tooth to target marketing, but fact of the matter remains that as of today the potential is unrealized. What then? The answer: give users options. The use of the word ‘option’ is deliberate and used as a contrast to ‘choice.’ Users do not have a choice given how not accepting cookies, PIEs, location-based tracking or registering renders many websites unavailable or useless. Instead of insisting on personalizing based on an algorithm and software imposed on users let the user community have full control on the information exchanged and degree of trade off. Being upfront and blunt about the tracking and information extracted and giving users options to consent or deny whilst explaining what withholding consent may mean is the only results-oriented path. This, however, should never result in a lack of access or being denied service. Customers should be able to search the web, buy books and leave comments on a forum, as examples, without the force of being tracked and targeted if they so choose. The proportion of the population that does consent to personalization and targeted marketing should be able to do so in degrees and in a customized fashion. What that means is the power to say ‘yes’ to tailored deals like those for metal band sweatshirts, but simultaneously and on the same platform, being able to say ‘no’ to grammar optimization apps (and 1,000 other equally unwanted ads). Another option, of course, is to say no to all of it: age, gender, income, location, the lot of it.

The down-side and why this is not done? A much smaller proportion of the audience will opt in. Marketing and technology have to live by the sword and die by the sword of results.

The up-side? The information provided by consenting users is much richer, pertinent and likely to lead to marketing success.

In other words, no more annoyingly immaterial gardening books being pushed to someone living on the twelfth floor while pretending relevant ads are being consumed.

mismatch

*Things That Need To Go Away: Claiming Customer Benefit As A Euphemism For Ensuring More Sales

Oct 302016
 

CMO has a nifty infographic on Online Marketing (also known as Web Marketing or Digital Marketing – in a moment you will know why I added the acronyms with which you are already familiar) they have borrowed that I wanted to share.

It is informative, easy to read and connects the dots on how to attract visitors, affiliates and buyers on the web. It is well worth a study to find the components and understand the relationships among the various concepts.

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However, to make it easier for everyone and create an even more unified set below you will find the definitions* for all the terms involved as well offering the components for each topic under them. So here it is above (image) and below (definitions) for everything you need this side of good content, which itself should be

  • long-form,
  • current and updated and
  • shared directly and, in turn, by influencers who received it from you directly or indirectly.

 

SEM: Search Engine Marketing is the purchase of advertising on search engines based on specific words or phrases input by the person using the website.

Tracking Codes: similar to cookies, these are a unique set of letters and numbers, essentially a code, which track users across the web for variables such as referring website, geographic location, keywords used and more. On a URL address the tracking codes appear after the question mark (?).

Bid Management: is the optimization of marketing spend on Internet marketing and advertising.

CPC: Cost Per Click refers to the cost to the advertiser every time someone clicks on one of its advertisements and is directed towards a designated web page. It is also known as PPC.

PPC: Pay Per ClickSee CPC

CTR: Click-Through Rate is the percentage or proportion of viewers who click on an advertisement on the Internet versus the total number of visitors to the web page who potentially view it.

Conversion Rate: a subset of CTR, this is the number of visitors who click on an advertisement and take the action desired by the advertiser such as make a purchase or register for an event.


Mobile Advertising: is advertising to customers who use mobile devices, which access the Internet. The metric is rising in importance as, according to Wikipedia, as much as 45% of Internet traffic stems from mobile devices.

Smart Phones: are mobile telephones, which have features that allow users to visit the Internet. The term is anachronistic as these devices increasingly do much more than allow for telephone calls.

MMS: Multimedia Messaging Services is one protocol for exchanging rich media over mobile devices.

Mobile Web Banner: pictorial advertising on the Internet which is designed to be best viewed on mobile devices.

Mobile Rich Media: these are similar to mobile web banners, which also feature audio and video.

SMS: Short Message Service is the protocol for exchanging text-only communication over mobile devices.


Inbound Marketing: uses content, relevance and channels to attract consumers to you. Relevant content blogging is one example of this type of marketing. Attractive Instagram or Pinterest images are other examples.

Leads: are persons, collectives or organizations which are interested enough in what you offer to show active or passive interest. The definition needs to be agreed to by all concerned at the company.

Sales: is the receipt of money or something of value in exchange for a good or service that is wanted or needed by the buyer.

Customers: a person or organization who buys or consumes another’s goods or services.

Improvement: is the act of making the activities of inbound marketing better.

Buy Cycle: the period of time and patterns of customers issuing buying commands.

Traffic: the number of visitors to a website and how often they return.


SMM: Social Media Marketing is the use of so-called Social Media (Pinterest, Twitter, etc.) websites to reach a desired audience.

Communities Online: are the users and visitors to websites which marketers target based on their particular interests.

Viral Marketing: is the type of marketing that through interest or innovation encourages users to pass on the message and advertising to other persons such as contacts.

Multimedia: is the use of audio, graphics and video in an interrelated way to promote a marketer’s message.

Mash-ups: is a web application, which presents content and features from more than one source to present a new system, advertisement or service. An example is the use of Bing Maps to locate specific type of retailers.

PR: the use of websites to promote one’s message. The websites could range from industry-specific websites to posts on websites like LinkedIn and twitter.

Conversion Rate: a subset of CTR, this is the number of visitors who click on an advertisement and take the action desired by the advertiser such as make a purchase or register for an event.


SEO: Search Engine Optimization is the process by which webmasters design and promote their websites to place nearer the top of search engine results thus attracting more visitors

Offsite Optimization: is the portion of SEO that happens elsewhere on the Internet. This includes having other websites link in, mentions, presence on Social Media and more.

SERPs: Search Engine Results’ Page is the specific page referred by a search engine based on the user’s query.

Backlinks: are links elsewhere on the Internet which point to the website in question.

Meta-tags: are a piece of code in the Internet’s language, namely HTML, that allows search to classify the website.

White Hat: refers to SEO techniques that are considered to honestly improve SERP and contrast with deceptive methods such as spam backlinks or including false descriptions in meta-tags.

Onsite Optimization: is the portion of SEO that happens on the website itself. This includes having visitors, mentions, coding, offering video content and more.


Web Site: is a collection of pages on the Internet or World Wide Web (www) that reside under one domain name.

URL: stands for the Uniform Resource Locator and is the alpha-numeric address associated with a website.

CMS: Content Management System allows for the creation and maintenance of the components of a website such as text, audio and video and their organization.

E-commerce: Electronic Commerce refers to the conduct of business on the Internet and could be as simple as the exchange of e-mails or a sophisticated purchasing and interaction engine.

CSS: Cascading Style Sheets is an Internet language which gives form to the way a web page is presented and with which sources it interacts.

JS: Java Script is an online and offline language that in the context of the Internet is used in conjunction with HTML to typically address the website’s interactions with its visitors and functionality. JS, among others, detects the browser, device or operating system used to visit it.

PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor is a language for the servers on which websites reside. It allows for dynamics websites and operation.

HTML: Hypertext Markup Language is the default language of the Internet used to create web pages’ content and format.


Media: images, audio or video presented or distributed or consumed on the Internet.

Images: a digital picture.

Ads: attracting attention to one’s goods or services on the Internet.

Videos: including visual media on a particular website.

Articles: including text information on the website.

Banner: pictorial advertising on the Internet.

Slides: refer to communicating through a presentation on the Internet.

Comments: a program that allows users and visitors to leave comments on websites to encourage visitors and interaction.


Affiliate Marketing: is an arrangement whereby website owners share revenue with ‘affiliates’ in exchange for web traffic, sales, promotions or registrations.

Advertiser: is the website owner in the affiliate marketing relationship.

Pay Per Lead: also known as PPL, this is the payment by advertiser or the website owner based on number of conversions or leads.

Cost Per Action: also known as CPA, this is the payment by advertiser or the website owner based on a predetermined contractual action such as visitors or sales.

Publisher: is the person or organization that promotes a product or service belonging to the advertiser in the affiliate marketing relationship.

Pay Per Sale: also known as PPS, this is the payment by advertiser or the website owner based on actual sales figures stemming from the affiliate. This metric has lower conversion rates, but is most ideal for advertisers whose goal is sales.

Affiliate Networks: is typically a middle-man or intermediary organization sitting between the website owners and advertiser and their publishers or affiliates. In exchange for a share of the revenue affiliate networks allow website owners to reach a larger audience and broader channel.


E-mail Marketing: is sending e-mails with commercial intent to either prospects or customers.

Landing Pages: is the web page a visitors arrives at based on clicking or responding to an advertisement or invitation.

Spam: also known as junk mail is the kind of e-mail which is unsolicited and often illegal.

B2B: short for business-to-business, this type of marketing is often more focused as it deals with the aim of commerce between two organizations.

B2C: short for business-to-customer or business-to-consumer, this type of marketing is often more broad as it deals with the aim of commerce between an organization and persons as customers. It is expected that B2C has shorter time span and is simultaneously quicker than B2B on average.

Clients: are customers (whether persons or organizations) or users of a product or service.

Links: often highlighted and underlined, links are pieces of code on the Internet whereby clicking on them allows users to jump to another web page or website.

Newsletter: or e-newsletter as sometimes called in Internet parlance, is a regularly or semi-regularly sent to actively communicate with prospects or customers.


Banner: is a graphic advertisement on a web page that is often clickable.

Adclicks: advertisement clicks are the number of times a form of advertising on a web page are clicked on by visitors.

Impressions: refers to the number of times an ad on the web is fetched by its ad server and sent to be viewed based on the presence of a viewer. Impressions, sometimes roughly called ‘eye balls,’ are monetized through the CPC or Cost Per Impression price.

Hover Ads: are web ads that hover over the page and are not dismissed by scrolling elsewhere on the web page.

Ad Server: is a server on the Internet which holds different ads for different participating websites and ‘serves’ them conditional on certain criteria such as the presence of visitors.

Content Ads: content advertisements are ones which offer more information and information than the standard ad aiming to persuade with an educational element. Other ad types are concept ads, which offer high production values, pop up ads and more.

Skyscraper: no surprise that skyscraper ads are vertical banner ads that run along the side of a web page.

 

 *The definitions are mine and offered, as much as possible, in the specific context of this article.

 

*Things That Need To Go Away: Intrusive, Invisible Or Opaque Marketing That Also Breach Privacy Rights